1 - Owner Information

2 - System Information

×

Small silver sticker located on system spec label. Starts with S/N *****

×

Small silver sticker located on system spec label. Starts with S/N*****

3 - Installer Information

4 - Wine Cellar Information

Room Dimensions




Insulation R-values

YES

NO

YES

NO

5 - DATA RECORDINGS

Note: All readings need to be taken while the compressor is running. Ensure all grilles, filters, components and ducting (if applicable), are properly installed before recording data. Also, allow a minimum of 30 minutes of run time to ensure system is properly stabilised.

YES

NO

YES

NO

×

Temperature of air entering the evaporator cooling unit, commonly known as "Return Air".

Using a calibrated thermometer, place the sensor in the center of the coil, or return grille 1 inch from touching any surface.

×

Temperature of air leaving the evaporator cooling unit, commonly known as "Supply Air".

Using a calibrated thermometer, place the sensor in the center of the air flow, 1 inch from touching any surface.

×

The temperature difference between return air temperature and supply air temperature of the evaporator cooling unit is commonly known as "Delta".

Equation: Return Air subtracted from Supply Air. (a-b = Delta T)

×

The temperature of air entering the coil of the condensing unit is commonly known as "Ambient Air".

Using a calibrated thermometer, place the sensor in the center of the condensing unit coil, 1 inch from touching any surface.

×

This pressure reading is taken at the high side of the condensing unit and will range from 100-200 Psi. This pressure is commonly known as "High Side Pressure".

Using a calibrated manifold, this pressure is taken at the liquid line service valve.

×

This reading is pressure converted to temperature. This reading is provided from the R134a Pressure Temperature Conversion Chart. Example: 216.3 Psi =136˚F

×

This measurement is the actual temperature of the copper line at the liquid line king valve.

Using a calibrated thermometer tightly secure the sensor with electrical tape to ensure solid contact to the surface of the copper line. Insulate the sensor to ensure there is no temperature influence from the condenser exhaust air. This will ensure you are reading the correct copper line temperature and not the surrounding air temperature.

×

The subcooling calculation is the head pressure converted to temperature subtracted from the liquid line temperature.

Equation - head pressure converted to temperature subtracted from the liquid line temperature. (f-g = h)

WhisperKOOL cooling units achieve optimum performance with a 5˚F subcooling at an ambient of 85˚F.

×

This is the pressure reading taken at the low side of the condensing unit and will range from 24-50 Psi. This pressure reading is commonly known as "Low Side Pressure".

Using a calibrated manifold, this pressure is taken at the Suction service valve.

×

This reading is pressure converted to temperature. This reading is provided from the R134a PT Conversion Chart. Example: 30.4 Psi = 35˚F

×

This measurement is the actual temperature of the copper line at the suction line service valve.

Using a calibrated thermometer tightly secure the sensor with electrical tape to ensure solid contact to the surface of the copper line. Insulate the sensor to ensure there is no temperature influence from the condenser exhaust air. This will ensure you are reading the correct copper line temperature and not the surrounding air temperature.

×

The superheat calculation is the temperature of the suction line subtracted from the suction pressure converted to temperature.

Equation - the temperature of the suction line subtracted from the suction pressure converted to temperature. (k-j = l)

×

This temperature is taken on the side of the compressor, 90% to the bottom. This reading ensures the compressor isn't running to cold. A low compressor temperature is a sign of low superheat and liquid refrigerant could be entering the compressor. Reading must be 30?F higher than the ambient temperature.

Using a calibrated thermometer, make sure the sensor is covered ensuring the surrounding air temperature in not influencing the reading.

×

Voltage is taken with a calibrated volt meter. Measure the voltage going from the connections going into the condensing unit for power. The system is rated for 120V (Unless stated 220 on condensing unit). Voltage must be between 113-130 Volts.

×

Using a calibrated amp meter, clamp the meter onto the "hot wire". This will be the black wire in the electrical box. Amps must not exceed manufacturing rating on the name plate.

Yes      No

If no, pour water into the drain pan to verfiy that the unit is draining properly.

×

Using a calibrated amp meter, clamp the meter onto the "hot wire". This will be the black wire in the electrical box. Amps must not exceed manufacturing rating on the name plate.

×

The accuracy of the results of this program are contingent upon the information provided. This document should only be used to provide a baseline reading. You should always consult a wine cellar professional to ensure that all variables which may affect a cooling unit's performance and function are accounted for.

Cellar construction is critical to the overall performance of the cooling unit. The quality and amount of the insulation used in your cellar's construction will affect the cooling unit's capacity, run time, and energy usage.

An adequate vapor barrier is paramount to the performance and efficiency of the cooling unit. A poor vapor barrier allows moisture to enter the cellar. This limits the cooling system's overall capacity, causes the unit to run longer, and generates excess condensation (which then needs to be disposed of).

Verify that the recommended cooling system is the best fit for your cellar. Consult with a qualified cellar contractor/ designer and make sure that you've considered all the variables (especially adequate ventilation and noise) before you select a cooling unit.